University of Pittsburgh

 

 

Graduate Students

FRENCH PHD

Karen Adams

kda9@pitt.edu

Karen Adams

Karen received a BA in French and History from Vassar College in 2003, where she wrote her senior thesis in History on the beguines, a medieval women's religious order. She is in her fourth year of the PhD with MA en route. Her research interests include Catholicism in French history and literature, in particular women, gender, and spirituality in the Middle Ages, and saints' lives.

 

Eleonore Bertrand

embertrand@gmail.com

Eleonore BertrandEléonore received her M.A. in English and American Literature and Civilization from the Université Paris-X, Nanterre, where she wrote her thesis on two first First Ladies and their pioneering role in the shaping of the American nation. She is currently a fifth-year Ph.D. student in the French Program and working on her dissertation entitled The Failure of the Self:  Siblings, Twins, and Best Friends in French Modernity. She is the recipient of a Lillian B. Lawler Fellowship for 2011-2012 and she now lives in New Haven, CT with her husband Leonel. She nurtures a deep interest in the transitional nation rebuilding itself from the shipwreck of past events. Her primary research interests include the notion of exile in 19th-century France, particularly the sentiment of étrangeté. Chateaubriand and Madame de Staël embody a generation of men and women that is lost in the present and who paradoxically find themselves constrained to live a life in abeyance. Finally, she loves writing, and is particularly interested in the oulipian creative / recreative act of writing. 

Maxime Bey-Rozet

mpb41@pitt.edu

maximine bey rozet bwMaxime Bey-Rozet is a first-year student in the Film Studies Ph.D. Program with a concentration in French. He holds a BA in English and Spanish literature from the Université Catholique d'Angers and an MA in Film Studies from the Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. He is interested in the intersection of early French horror cinema and French literature of the first half of the 20th century.

 

Gabriel Boyer

gsb20@pitt.edu

Gabriel Boyer

Gabriel Boyer received his BA in French and Francophone Studies: Language and Culture and has a minor in Religious Studies from Penn State University.  Gabriel is a first year PhD (MA en route) graduate student in the Department of French and Italian at Pitt.  His primary interests of study are religion, 19th-20th century literature and history.

 

Mert Ertunga

mee26@pitt.edu

mert ertungaMert received his B.A. in French from the University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB) in '07. He previously received his B.S. in Finance ('89-UAB) and his M.B.A. ('93-UAB).  He is studying towards a PhD degree in French Literature and his area of interest includes the negotiation of literary identity during the height of the “philosophe vs. anti-philosophe” conflict in the middle of the 18th century.  His research focuses on the literary output of writers whose careers were influenced by the two camps during the period of 1750-65, as well as writers who neither joined one camp nor the other during the conflict. 

Ex-professional tennis player and coach, Mert writes articles for tennis publications on each side of the Atlantic Ocean and keeps a blog.

He was born in Istanbul, and has a daughter, Erin.

 

Anne Ganster

amg173@pitt.edu

Anne Ganster

Anne received her BA in Political Science from American University in Washington D.C. and her MA in French from Middlebury College. She is currently in her second year of the PhD program. Her general research interests include 20th century French literature, self-writing, gender studies and politics. Most recently, her research has focused on theories of subjectivity and truth in the autobiographical writings of Simone de Beauvoir. 

Awards and Achievements: A&S Fellow (2010-2011); Recipient of le Prix Bambas for excellence in literary studies, August 2010, Middlebury College; Participant in the French Cultural Studies Institute, Dartmouth College, June 2011.

Sylvia Grove

smg104@pitt.edu

Sylvia GroveSylvia Grove received her B.A. in French and Creative Writing from Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA, after which she served as an assistante d’anglais at the Lycée Gustave Eiffel in Talange, France, and returned to Pennsylvania as a freelance journalist and high school English teacher. At Pitt, she focuses on questions of otherness, spaces, and the politics of food in French literature. She is in her second year of her PhD with an M.A. en route.

 

Andrea Jonsson

alj43@pitt.edu

Andrea

Andrea Jonsson is a Montana native currently working towards a PhD in French Literature. She received the DALF (Diplôme Approfondi de la Langue

Française) from the Université d’Aix-Marseille I in 2003, and her Bachelor’s Degree in Music from McGill University in 2004. She then lived in Paris teaching English, consulting, and translating in advertising agencies for three years while working towards an MA in English Literature at the Open University. Her research interests include pedagogy, affect theory, space, architecture, topography, and cartography in literary discourse. A writer herself, Andrea recently had her first short story published in the anthology Strangers in Paris by Tightrope Books.

Jennifer Boum Make

jeb235@pitt.edu

Jennifer Boum Make

Jennifer is a French native speaker. She received her BA (2011) and MA (2013) in English from the University of Paris Ouest Nanterre. After a year of teaching in Shakespeare country, she participated in the exchange program with Pitt, where she worked as a French instructor for a year (2012-2013), before she decided to work towards a PhD in French literature.

She wrote a master's thesis entitled: The Individual in Space before and after 9/11. Her primary interests in spatial aesthetics, urban spaces and the spatial construction of the individual continue with questions of transpatiality and hybridity in the Mediterranean literature, especially Algerian and Moroccan literatures. Her broad research interests also include the theme of exile.


 

Maeva Mateos

mateos-maeva@hotmail.fr

Maeva MateosMaeva is currently working towards a PhD in French literature. A French native, she received her BA in English from the University of Nanterre (Paris X) in 2007 and completed her first year MA in British literature in 2008, before she came to Pitt as an exchange student/French TA. She wrote a Master’s thesis centered on George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss, in which she considered the dialogue between the private and public spheres during the Victorian period. A significant part of this work treated the consequences resulting from the gender-related conflicts and tensions within society. Her current research includes: la femme du 18ème siècle qui lit et écrit/lire et écrire la femme du 18ème siècle in French literature.


 

Delphine Monserrat

drm74@pitt.edu

Delphine Monserrat

Delphine, a French native, is currently working towards a PhD in French Literature. She received her B.A. in English, her M.A. in English and her M.A. in Teaching French as a Foreign Language from the Université Paris IV Sorbonne. Her research interests include second-language acquisition, translation and comparative stylistics.

 

Katie Moriarty

kemoriarty@gmail.com

Katie MoriartyKatie double-majored in International Studies/Political Science and French at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (BA 04). As a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar, she received a DEA in Etudes europeennes (politique, economique et societe) from the Institut europeen de l'Universite de Geneve. In the Fall of 2007, she began the PhD program in French Literature and Politics. Katie is particularly interested in the French nation of the late 20th and 21st centuries. For her dissertation, she hopes to explore the effects of the European Union on the French nation in literature during these times periods.

 

David Spieser-Landes

des93@pitt.edu  

David Spieser-Landes David Spieser-Landes comes from Alsace where he grew up speaking French, Elsässerditsch (Alsatian) and Hochdeutsch (German).
His dissertation, titled “The Politics of Aesthetics: Nation, Region and Immigration in Contemporary French Culture,” uses Jacques Rancière’s theoretical framework to examine the role of “French” literature in imagining a homogeneous “French” “nation” diachronically, but also to analyze the different ways in which “regional literature”/cultural production (e.g. André Weckmann’s “Alsatian novels”) and “banlieue literature”/cultural production (e.g. Abd al Malik’s rap) are effectively breaking national unison in present-day France.
Before coming to Pittsburgh, David Spieser-Landes earned a French Master’s Degree in American Civilization from Université Lyon 2, France. He then held a Teaching Assistantship at Penn State University, and taught French for two years at Lycoming College in Williamsport, PA

Paulina Tomkowicz

pat35@pitt.edu

Paulina Tomkowicz 

Paulina received her BA and MA degrees in Applied Linguistics, English and French, specialising in translation and teaching, from Maria Curie Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland. She is in her second year of the PhD with MA en route. Her interests include Cultural and Women's Studies as well as possible relations between film and literature. In her free time she jumps out of planes.

 

John Trenton

jdt42@pitt.edu

John Trenton 

John is a first-year student pursuing his PhD with MA en route.  He is a native of southwestern Pennsylvania, but received his first BS in the Recording Industry from Middle Tennessee State University in 2003 where he minored in French, Mathematics and Electro-Acoustics.  During his studies at MTSU, he participated in an exchange program and interned as an engineer for France Bleu Cotentin.  After graduating he was a language assistant at Lycée Boissy d’Anglas in Annonay, France.  During his travels, John nourished a taste for the culinary world and a strong interest in French colonialism.  After a short stint in the recording industry in Nashville, he moved to the booming city of Phoenix, Arizona in 2005 to pursue a career in the restaurant industry to support his graduate studies.

Unexpectedly, John became caught up in the business and found himself, several years later, as an executive chef.  Realizing that he had lost sight of his academic goals, he decided to hang up the chef coat and attended Arizona State University where he completed his BA in French with additional coursework in Economics in 2011.  His interest in food continues with the hybridity of cuisine and culture as well as his interest in colonial and postcolonial studies.  Other research interests include economics (exchange, trade and growth) and politics in literature (across all periods), mobility and migrations of people, travel literature, exoticism, and materialism.

 

Paul Wallace

pdw11@pitt.edu

Originally from the small town of Fairmont in West Virginia, Paul studied Foreign Languages (French and Spanish) at West Virginia University and received his BA in 2009. He stayed on at WVU for another two years during which he finished his MA in French Literature. He is interested by almost everything to do with French literature and culture and is making a mighty effort to coalesce these varied curiosities into a more focused corpus. In his spare time, Paul enjoys reading (obviously), camping, and dabbling in creative fiction.

 

ITALIAN MA

Amanda Bock

amb193@pitt.edu

Amanda BockAmanda double-majored in French and Italian and received her BA from the University of Pittsburgh in 2009.  She also worked for a year in France after studying Interior Design for two years at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.  A recipient of the French and Italian Quasi Scholarship, Amanda studied in Sicily at the Mediterranean Center for Arts and Sciences in the summer of 2008.  Her research interests include second language acquisition in Romance languages, sociolinguistics, and narrative poetry.

 

Gina Mangravite

gmm50@pitt.edu

Gina MangraviteGina is a first year MA student in the Italian program. She received a BA in Comparative Literature with a minor in Italian from Franklin & Marshall College in 2012, where she wrote her senior thesis on mother-daughter relationships in Italian and American Y.A. literature. During her undergraduate career, Gina spent three summers studying with F&M in Vicchio, Italy, while in the last two acting as the T.A. for the program. During her senior year at F&M, Gina worked as the research assistant to Dr. Faleschini Lerner on her recently published book, Carlo Levi’s Visual Poetics. She also published an essay of her own, “La fusione tra la scrittura e l’arte visiva: Adriano Spatola & la poesia visiva” in The Kennesaw Tower (vol 4), an undergraduate foreign language journal. Gina’s interests include portrayals of the south, immigration, and women in post 18th century literature and film.

 

Danielle Marsh

dnm21@pitt.edu

 

Danielle Marsh

Danielle Marsh is a first year MA    student in the Italian Department. She graduated magna cum laude in 2011 with a BA in Italian and Communication Rhetoric and a minor in French from the University of Pittsburgh. She studied abroad in the six-week Pitt in Italy program in Siracusa, Sicily in 2009, and has since returned to the city to work and to volunteer.  During the 2011-2012 school year, she taught high school English as an Assistante d’Anglais at Lycée Jean Guéhenno in Flers, Normandy. Danielle’s interests include the “Questione del Mezzogiorno” and Sicilian identity through rhetoric, dialect literature, and issues related to Mediterranean immigration.

 

Sabrina Righi

sar110@pitt.edu

frit.jpg

Sabrina graduated from the University of Bologna where she received a BA in Foreign Languages and Literatures (American and German) and earned a Master Degree cum laude in Language, Society and Communication. During her undergraduate studies, she spent two semesters as an Erasmus fellow student at the Universität Klagenfurt (Austria). After graduation she collaborated with the English Linguistic Division and the CeSLiC Center at the University of Bologna and she published the article, “L'African American Vernacular English: una varietà linguistica sovra-regionale”, in Quaderni del CeSLiC. Her experience as Italian Foreign Language Teaching Assistant at Saint Louis University in 2009-2010 was fundamental in her decision to apply to a master's program in the US. Her academic interests include Twentieth-century Italian Literature and History, especially the Fascist Era and the Resistance period. She also is very interested in Language Pedagogy and Second Language Acquisition.

Alice Sagasta

als312@pitt.edu

 

EXCHANGE

Alice Demuynck

ald172@pitt.edu

alice demuynck

Alice Demuynck, a French native, received a BA in English Language and Literatures and a MA in Translation from Paris Ouest University in France. She studied for a year as an exchange student at the University of Warwick in the UK, where she took Theatre and Gender courses. She now teaches French as a TA and studies Writing and Theatre at the University of Pittsburgh. She is interested in how people(s) perceive the world and render it in both oral and written discourses and is currently working on turning this into a more precise project.

 


 

 

 

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